Category Archives: Side Dish

Cream Cheese Jalapeño Wontons

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There’s always so much to discover in the produce section of the grocery store. I just love checking out all the items that I’ve never tried before and figuring out how I could incorporate them into recipes.

My neighborhood grocery store carries lots of variety to cater to the diverse residents of our area. Right next to artichokes and peppers, you’ll find lemongrass, aloe vera, and giant cactus leaves. So many fun things to try.

On a recent, weekly grocery store trip, I discovered wonton wrappers in the refrigerated produce section. There they were, right next to the mini bags of baby carrots and prepackaged sugar snap peas. Beside them were egg roll wrappers. Two things I’m sure most grocery stores carry, yet I never seem to come across when I have a recipe in mind that requires them. Both sounded like a fun adventure; however, deciding I’d better start with something a little more simple, I opted for the wonton wrappers. Just wrap them around some cream cheese, and you’ve got a simple, two-ingredient appetizer.

Since I was already in the produce section, fresh jalapeños were just a few feet away. Why not add a third ingredient to give the wontons a little kick, right? So, into the cart they went.

Along with a bag of Meyer lemons. Haven’t decided what I’ll do with them yet, but they were just so cute and irresistible!

Anyway, the wontons were quick to put together and drew rave reviews, so I thought I’d share my recipe here. Even better, these are baked, so they are healthier than the traditional fried wontons. Enjoy!

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Cream Cheese Jalapeño Wontons

12 wonton wrappers
1 small jalapeño, finely diced (about 1/4 cup)
4 oz. cream cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Mix cream cheese and jalapeños in a small bowl.

Fill a second small bowl with water to use for sealing wontons.

Place wonton wrappers on cutting board and portion out cream cheese mixture among all 12 wrappers by placing about a teaspoon of mixture in the center of each wonton.

Dip your finger into the small bowl of water and wet the edges of the wonton wrapper all the way around.

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Pull up opposite corners over mixture and seal on top.

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Then, pull up the remaining two corners and seal to form a little bundle with the corners all sealed on top. Place on a parchment paper lined baking sheet.

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Bake at 400 degrees for 8 -10 minutes or until wonton wrappers begin to brown slightly.

Serve with red chili garlic sauce for dipping.

Note: You can make these in advance and refrigerate until ready to bake.

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Cuke Salad at the Cabin

We just finished a week at the family cabin in northern Minnesota. The boys love spending time at the cabin. This trip was filled with card games, tubing, campfires, and canoe rides. Oh, and simple, delicious food, of course. No other words necessary. I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves…

The Oldest Learning How to Canoe

Grandma’s Wildflower Garden

Sunset on the Lake

Raccoons – Our Biggest Visitors

Hummingbirds – Our Littlest Visitors

Campfire with Smores and Ghost Stories

Spaetzle Maker Recommendation

Looking for a good spaetzle maker? If you’re serious about spaetzle like I am, you may want to buy a spaetzle maker. They aren’t a common item to find in a typical retail store. You might find one at a fancy cooking store, but it would probably be pretty pricy there. I stumbled across mine years ago in the kitchen section of TJ Maxx. They are pretty inexpensive and can save you a lot of time.

Here’s one for less than $10 on Amazon which is very similar to mine and is well reviewed. It’s the Norpro Spaetzle Maker with the hopper design which makes quick work out of cutting the noodles and dropping them into the steaming pot of water below. Amazon gives this one 4 1/2 stars out of 5.

On the other hand, if you have a lot of time and patience…and coordination, you can give the traditional German method a try, which involves laying the spaetzle dough on a cutting board and then chopping small bits of dough with a sharp knife while angling the board over boiling water so the bits drop into the water to cook as they are chopped. While the traditional method takes plenty of practice, many German households even today consider it the only way to make spaetzle. I’ll stick with my spaetzle maker. Whatever method you choose…Guten appetit!